Was Jesus Christ born on Christmas day?

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Christmas is so close and I’m sure you have already made your houses sparkle with all the cheerful, festive lights and I am pretty sure that a richly decorated Christmas tree is brightening the living rooms where you, your families and friends will gather to celebrate the Nativity, the birth of the baby Jesus. But, are you fully aware of what you are about to celebrate? As, you have to know, if you don’t know it already, that Jesus Christ was not born at all on Christmas day; the 25th of December was the birthday of Mithras.

Mithras who? I guess, some of you would ask ; just wait a minute as I have to give you some information first. You have to know that there is no real evidence about either the precise year or the day of Christ’s birth. It seems that around the third century AD some Christians had started celebrating Christ’s birth, as well as his death, on March 25th, the spring Equinox, a day that symbolized the “rebirth of the earth”, but as far as we know the celebration of Christ’s birth was not general until the fourth century.

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Aureliano

By the time of Aurelian’s reign (around 214-275 AD), it appears that the god Mithras (originally a Persian deity who was said to be either the son of the sun or the companion of the sun) was earning popularity among traveling Roman soldiers. Aurelian decided to seize on an opportunity to bring a monotheistic cult to the Roman Empire, and it is likely that his motivation was to compete with Christianity – a growing monotheistic religion that he saw as a threat to the empire. Hence, the Dies Natalis Solis Invicti, “The Birth of the Unconquered Sun,” was  established to celebrate Mithras on the twenty-fifth of December 274 AD . The choice of the day was particularly symbolical, as, at that time, it was considered the winter solstice, that is, the moment when days begin to lengthen and the power of the sun to increase; the fittest day for the son of the sun.

jesus3The Egyptians represented the new-born sun by the image of an infant, which they used to bring forth and exhibit to his worshippers on his birthday and kindle lights in token of festivity. When the doctors of the Church perceived that this celebration was becoming dangerously popular even among the Christians, they took counsel and resolved that the true Nativity should be solemnized on that day and the festival of the Epiphany on the sixth of January. Accordingly, along with this custom, the practice has prevailed of kindling fires till the sixth of January. That’s why we keep on lighting our towns and houses after so many centuries: in memory of the god of the sun!! In short, Christmas is nothing but a relic of the worship of a pagan god known by the Persians as Mithra or Mithras dressed in Christian symbolism and a lot of lights.

Let me wish you then, Merry Mithras day and a Happy New Year!!! 🙂