Looking for Santa Claus

There is one category of people I truly don’t understand these days : the seekers of good news or the blind to bad ones, if you prefer.They are those who, rather than being preoccupied by negative data, work for interpreting them in the less alarming possible way, minimizing them. They believe in the healing effect of optimism. They claim that people don’t have to be traumatized with truths, but rather they have to learn to seek the good in what seems so indisputably bad. If ther isn’t any, they endevour to build one, brand new.

Hence, if you dare say to one of those that the number of dead is increasing, they will reply that it is not so, that the charts are wrong, as they include also those who died for cancer, for example, so, displaying the excellence of their argumentative skills, they have died WITH Covid and not BECAUSE OF Covid.

If you make them notice that intensive care units are filling up rapidly, they will answer that neither the 30 per cent of the available intensive care units has been reached yet, which is an uncontrovertible truth, forgetting, nevertheless, that only the 30 per cent of intensive care units are for Covid sick, hence, if we are now at the 29 per cent, unless one feels like discussing it, the system is very close to collapse.

If at this point they feel backed into the corner, they exhibit articles where some eminent dummy has written that actually intensive cares are emptying, which is, once again, uncontrovertibly true, but they don’t feel like considering that they are emptying, because people are dying.

Even when you show accurate studies which demonstrate that for 100 people who are Covid infected 3,8% die in Italy, which makes us the third country in the world after Mexico and Iran and the first in Europe, they will accurately explain once again, that this is because we include those who died WITH Covid and not FOR Covid, differently from what the other countries do.Their source of information? The usual dispensers of good news wearing a medical gown they worship on Facebook.

Hence, I have come to the conclusion that trying to talk with these people is useless, in fact, I have understood that they don’t want to delude, but rather being deluded. They are just naive, as they are simply unable to accept the truth, especially when it comes in such an ominous shape. They need to believe that soon everything will be all right, that soon is now, otherwise they react as those children once hinted that after all Santa Claus might not exist: impossible!!

And here from this enchanting gardens of this churchyard destined to Covid victims, when I look around and I see dozens and dozens of hearses one after another, a line echoes in my mind:

“So many. I had not thought death had undone so many” (The Waste Land)

I wish I could see Santa Claus here, but I can’t find him anywhere.

The Right to Party

We have lived fortunate times, this is for sure. No world conflicts, economic boom,  lucky enough to have inherited fundamental rights we have not fought for, which have made our lives safer, more guaranteed, more dignified. 

We have lived fortunate times, so fortunate that leisure has become the “pillar” of our lives. In the past only a few bunch of people had time and money to enjoy leisure. The others were quite content, if they could provide their families with food, shelter and education for their children. 

We have lived fortunate times; but the “pillar” which has held up our lives  is about crack under the blows of the outbreak, as our leisures are at stake, since a new lockdown is very close. 

We have lived fortunate times, that is why we are unprepared to fight the enemy. We have never bumped into any, so we do not accept its threatening existence, moreover, it cannot be seen, so it is much easier to close our eyes and try to ignore it.

We have lived fortunate times, to be sure, but solidarity and the awareness of belonging to a community have given way to individualism  and selfishness, thus weakening any effort of developing common strategies .

We have lived fortunate times, times which have produced,nevertheless, generations of parents and children who are no longer focused on fundalental values such as education, commitment, effort, for example.

We have lived fortunate times, that is why we cannot conceive a world  made of common sacrifices and limitantions, even when those are due to an unpredictable emergency. We don’t want our lives to be changed, the life of our children cannot be changed, hence, it has become vital to preserve our right and their right to socialization and fun, therefore, pubs, bars, restaurants etc,  ought to remain open. Psycholoysts blabber about the amount of damages this generation of adolescents will suffer from deprived proximity to friends, forgetting that this generation has made of isolation their distinctive trait much before the pandemic. They have always enjoyed being isolated for hours with their playstation, they are isolated even when they are with their group of friends, always stuck to their cellphones, they live isolated in their families. A month of two of lockdown can have no prolongued effect on our children, for one main reason above all: they are young. They have all their life to live and they will forget, that is a privilege of the young. The only risk they might run is that of  learning a lesson from this event, if we allowed them, of course.

We have lived fortunate times, but are we so sure they have been thus fortunate?

#WitchWeek2020 Day 2: A Gothic Reading of The Betrothed

Lizzie Ross

Today’s guest blogger, e-Tinkerbell, lives in Italy, so it’s no surprise that she brings this classic Italian novel from the 19th century to our attention. e-Tinkerbell is a high school English teacher who loves literature, history… and shoes. She blogs at e-Tinkerbell. All translations from the Italian are hers. Buona lettura!


The Betrothed (I Promessi Sposi*) is well known as an iconic love story, like Romeo and Juliet, but it is actually much more than this. We are talking about the greatest Italian novel of modern times and its author, Alessandro Manzoni, is considered the main Italian novelist of the 19thcentury and leader of the nation’s romantic movement. “With the exception of Dante’s Comedy, no other book has been the object of more intense scrutiny or more intense scholarship” writes the Italian scholar Sergio Pacifici. The Betrothed, in fact, still forms an…

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